Beauty,  Fashion

AFRICAN BEAUTY : THE DOS THE DONTS

We have come a long way as a people… In South African beauty history, people used to say that the only form of accepted African beauty was the beauty of a white woman. Dark skin women wanted to look like their lighter skin friends and light skin women wanted to look white. Now in the new South Africa I see a change from the mental slavery that once held us in bondage. I see dark skin women loving their skin tones and people in general being more comfortable in their own skin. It’s refreshing.

It’s weird thou because when I turn on my TV and watch E entertainment and other such shows, all I see is people wanting to be different, some black women want to still look white and some white women wanting to look darker by tanning.

Being an African is not limited o or exclusive to skin colour or skin tone. I just Goggled ‘what is being an African’ and Google hit back with- A person from Africa, especially a black person. I get it, that is the “politically” correct term of describing an ‘African; but I do think that that kind of explanation on its own creates diversity and exclusion , especially to non-black Africans. It’s so weird that people expect a black person born in Columbia for instance to know about Africa, which is unfair. If you have never been to Africa and your black great grandfather knows no Africanism, can a person then really say that they are African or that they relate to Africans based solely on their skin tone?

‘The people of Africa is more than a name, it is linked to indigenous rights and issues of sovereignty. Africaness and skin color are not verifications of each other. ‘Blackness’ fails at every level in both the historical and political context. Africans are the natural people of Africa: The diverse African beauty hair textures, the diverse skin of African beauty hues, are all specific adaptations to living in the diverse African landscape. For this reason alone ‘skin blackness” is certainly not a marker for African identity; far too many native Africans, depending on geography, have light skin. The Motherland of these adaptations and the cultures are primarily Africa; hence the relevance of the name. ‘African’ refers exclusively to the historical people of Africa and their descendants in the Diaspora. In plain language, no one is an African unless they can also be considered a ‘Black’ person. But not every ‘Black person’ is an African either. READ MORE HERE…

How many times have you heard a black person from America say that they are African American? Many times right?? Yet some of those people know nothing about Africa. But because they are black they should be labeled Afro-American? Nope.. in essence, no one is an African unless you have genetic ties to Africa or you were born and bred In Africa.

African beauty is beauty that’s not primarily considered as western. The long of it is that African beauty is not long hair because the original black African didn’t have long hair and if they did have long hair, their hair was curled or coiled in a thick none flowly texture which we now call Afro because of where it originated from. African beauty

The world considers African Beauty as a person who has an afro or natural hair, scorched by the sun with brown eyes. To be African is not to have long hair or skinny as Africans are known to be thick and have big buns. But African beauty is universal beauty.

The thick lips, the high cheek bones the course hair, the wide noses and the brown eyes are strongly found in the genetic makeup of some ordinary Asians, Americans and Europeans. So African beauty is not limited to just Africans, we share our beauty with our peers and we pass on our African genetic makeup onto our children raised by either two African parents or a mix.

When a woman has African inspired makeup and wears African clothes can we then say that that person possesses African beauty? I don’t think so… being an Africa is more than what we wear. Being an African is how we walk, how we carry ourselves and how we celebrate our culture and heritage and how we pass it on. Being an African is remembering that where we come from we sit on thrones and that we are queens and kings and should never look down on ourselves or feel pity and sorrow  for our current bad situations. #ItGetsEasier

Being an African is being courageous and not being scared. Before people were shipped off to the cold west, we looked after our animals and cattle and we could walk for days. We chilled in the burning sun with no sun screen and we were ok. Being an African is remembering our roots and teaching our children. African beauty is what we wear on our sleeves and African beauty is the hair we wear on our heads as crowns.

xoxo

 

Earrings: Lovisa

Headpiece: Lovisa

Lipstick: Mix – L’Oreal and Mac cosmetics  Flat out fabulous.

Eye Shadow: Beauty Treat nude eye shadow pallet

Liquid foundation: L’Oreal pro matte liquid foundation

Concealers: LA Girl pro concealers

 

 

 

 

 

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